Historical Figure Report​
800px-FerdinandIsabellaSpain[1].jpg
Using the Time covers (http://www.time.com/time/coversearch) as examples, but without copying them, create a report on the historical figure of the Middle Ages and Renaissance that you have picked. The report must include:
a. Time Person of the Year cover which has:
  • a picture of the person, with other images that reflect that person's accomplishments
  • a caption which explains the importance of that person
  • and a masthead with the date appropriate for the person

b. An essay about your person which:

  • begins with a "hook" that would make a person want to read the rest
  • describes the person's life from beginning to end
  • focuses most of the information on why the person is important
  • ends with a conclusion which restates the main idea and reminds us why this person still matters

c. A list of key dates in the person's life in chronological order

d. At least one other information sharing format such as cartoon, political cartoon, editorial, picture and captions map, graphic, or advertisement related to the person and the time.

e. A bibliography-You will use the MLA citation Style Sheet to correctly submit a listing of the resources you have utilized for your project. You must utilize at least three different types of resources. You may not only use the internet.

    • Time Person of the Year Research Project

    • 414px-King_Henry_VIII_by_Hans_Holbein_the_Younger[1].jpg



Library Resources
Print
You will find print resources in the non-fiction, biography and reference sections of the library. The Encyclopedia of World Biography is a wonderful resource for this particular project. Conduct a search on your assigned person using the library catalog. Use key words to conduct your search.
On-Line Databases
Grolier
EBSCO Host
Websites
ipl2 is the result of a merger of the Internet Public Library (IPL) and the Librarians' Internet Index (LII). This is a great site to find reliable information.
http://www.ipl.org/

Middle Ages
Exploring Ancient World Cultures
http://eawc.evansville.edu/mepage.htm
Feudal Life
http://www.learner.org/interactives/middleages/feudal.html

Renaissance
Leonardo daVinci
http://www.mos.org/leonardo/
Michaelangelo Buonartotti (This site has music, so borrow a headset at the circulation desk!)
http://www.michelangelo.com/buon/
Medici (contains brief biographies of Renaissance artists)
http://www.pbs.org/empires/medici
Renaissance and Baroque Art
http://www.artic.edu/artaccess/AA_RenBar/index.html
Reformation
Martin Luther
http://www.pbs.org/empires/martinluther/
End of Europe's Middle Ages
http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_history/tutor/endmiddle/


Scientific Revolution
European Enlightenment The Scientific Revolution
http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/ENLIGHT/SCIREV.HTM

Pictures from wikimedia.org
Ferdinand and Isabella http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:FerdinandIsabellaSpain.jpg
Henry VIII http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Henry_VIII_(6)_by_Hans_Holbein_the_Younger.jpg

California 7th-grade History Standards


7.6 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Medieval Europe.
1. Study the geography of the Europe and the Eurasian land mass, including its location, topography, waterways, vegetation, and climate and their relationship to ways of life in Medieval Europe.
2. Describe the spread of Christianity north of the Alps and the roles played by the early church and by monasteries in its diffusion after the fall of the western half of the Roman Empire. 3. Understand the development of feudalism, its role in the medieval European economy, the way in which it was influenced by physical geography (the role of the manor and the growth of towns), and how feudal relationships provided the foundation of political order.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the conflict and cooperation between the Papacy and European monarchs (e.g., Charlemagne, Gregory VII, Emperor Henry IV).
5. Know the significance of developments in medieval English legal and constitutional practices and their importance in the rise of modern democratic thought and representative institutions (e.g., Magna Carta, parliament, development of habeas corpus, an independent judiciary in England).
6. Discuss the causes and course of the religious Crusades and their effects on the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish populations in Europe, with emphasis on the increasing contact by Europeans with cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean world.
7. Map the spread of the bubonic plague from Central Asia to China, the Middle East, and Europe and describe its impact on global population.
8. Understand the importance of the Catholic church as a political, intellectual, and aesthetic institution (e.g., founding of universities, political and spiritual roles of the clergy, creation of monastic and mendicant religious orders, preservation of the Latin language and religious texts, St. Thomas Aquinas’s synthesis of classical philosophy with Christian theology, and the concept of "natural law").
9. Know the history of the decline of Muslim rule in the Iberian Peninsula that culminated in the Reconquista and the rise of Spanish and Portuguese kingdoms.

7.8 Students analyze the origins, accomplishments, and geographic diffusion of the Renaissance.
1. Describe the way in which the revival of classical learning and the arts fostered a new interest in humanism (i.e., a balance between intellect and religious faith).
2. Explain the importance of Florence in the early stages of the Renaissance and the growth of independent trading cities (e.g., Venice), with emphasis on the cities’ importance in the spread of Renaissance ideas.
3. Understand the effects of the reopening of the ancient "Silk Road" between Europe and China, including Marco Polo’s travels and the location of his routes.
4. Describe the growth and effects of new ways of disseminating information (e.g., the ability to manufacture paper, translation of the Bible into the vernacular, printing).
5. Detail advances made in literature, the arts, science, mathematics, cartography, engineering, and the understanding of human anatomy and astronomy (e.g., by Dante Alighieri, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo di Buonarroti Simoni, Johann Gutenberg, William Shakespeare).

7.9 Students analyze the historical developments of the Reformation.
1. List the causes for the internal turmoil in and weakening of the Catholic church (e.g., tax policies, selling of indulgences).
2. Describe the theological, political, and economic ideas of the major figures during the Reformation (e.g., Desiderius Erasmus, Martin Luther, John Calvin, William Tyndale).
3. Explain Protestants’ new practices of church self-government and the influence of those practices on the development of democratic practices and ideas of federalism.
4. Identify and locate the European regions that remained Catholic and those that became Protestant and explain how the division affected the distribution of religions in the New World.
5. Analyze how the Counter-Reformation revitalized the Catholic church and the forces that fostered the movement (e.g., St. Ignatius of Loyola and the Jesuits, the Council of Trent).
6. Understand the institution and impact of missionaries on Christianity and the diffusion of Christianity from Europe to other parts of the world in the medieval and early modern periods; locate missions on a world map.
7. Describe the Golden Age of cooperation between Jews and Muslims in medieval Spain that promoted creativity in art, literature, and science, including how that cooperation was terminated by the religious persecution of individuals and groups (e.g., the Spanish Inquisition and the expulsion of Jews and Muslims from Spain in 1492).

7.10 Students analyze the historical developments of the Scientific Revolution and its lasting effect on religious, political, and cultural institutions.
1. Discuss the roots of the Scientific Revolution (e.g., Greek rationalism; Jewish, Christian, and Muslim science; Renaissance humanism; new knowledge from global exploration).
2. Understand the significance of the new scientific theories (e.g., those of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton) and the significance of new inventions (e.g., the telescope, microscope, thermometer, barometer).
3. Understand the scientific method advanced by Bacon and Descartes, the influence of new scientific rationalism on the growth of democratic ideas, and the coexistence of science with traditional religious beliefs.

Information Literacy Standards

1.2 Knows Parts of a Book and Digital Resources
1.2.2 Identifies parts of a book: table of contents, publisher, page numbers, copyright date, and call number
1.2.5 Identifies online terms and their uses (e.g., home page, Web page, url, responsibility statement, search engine)
1.7 Uses Digital Resources to Access Information
1.7.3 Uses databases (e.g., cd-roms, online free and fee-based services) for school use
1.9 Uses a Developmentally Appropriate Research Process to Access Information
1.9.1 Identifies a problem or question that needs information
1.9.2 Uses presearch strategies such as brainstorming, mapping, and recalling of prior knowledge
1.9.3 Identifies and uses keywords to find specific information
1.9.4 Uses keywords and controlled vocabulary to develop search statements for use with databases, search engines, digital books, and other digital sources and formats
1.9.5 Formulates questions that define the scope of the investigation
1.9.6 Selects a topic, focuses the investigation, and gathers information in order to construct a meaningful final product
1.9.7 Uses Dewey call numbers to locate books in areas of interest or to explore topics in depth
1.9.8 Selects and reads familiar and unfamiliar material independently
1.9.9 Uses a variety of print and digital reference material (e.g., dictionary, almanac, thesaurus,atlas, encyclopedia, and periodicals) to locateinformation
1.9.10 Uses title, table of contents, chapter headings, and navigation elements to locate information in books and digital resources
1.9.11 Uses subheadings to locate information in nonfiction resources
1.9.12 Obtains information from illustrations, photographs, charts, graphs, maps, and tables
1.9.13 Uses scanning and skimming skills to locate relevant information
1.9.14 Continues to show growth in selection of sources and formats for educational andpersonal use
1.9.15 Uses cross references (see, see also) to locate relevant information
1.9.16 Identifies bibliographic references
1.9.17 Uses bibliographies in books and digital resources to access information beyond the immediatesource and school library media collection
1.9.18 Uses a variety of print and digital information resources to facilitate research
1.9.19 Uses advanced and specialized reference books and digital resources
1.9.20 Identifies and uses computer icons and program menus to search for information (e.g., locates an index, navigates a subject tree, accesses a help screen)
1.9.21 Refines search strategies for research projects
1.9.22 Selects and uses a variety of appropriate media to access information for assignments
1.9.23 Records author, title, and other citation elements systematically while accessing information sources
2.3 Selects Relevant Information during the Research Process
2.3.1 Understands that notetaking is a tool forinformation processing (e.g., remembering, comparing, analyzing, and sequencing)
2.3.2 Selects and records relevant information, organizing notes in a format appropriate to the task
2.3.3 Restates facts and details to clarify and organize ideas for notetaking standard